Learning Doesn’t Progress the Way You Think It Does – TIME

See on Scoop.itDr. Dan’s Knowledge Management


KQED
Learning Doesn’t Progress the Way You Think It Does
TIME
As we learn, this model assumes, we steadily ascend in our knowledge and skills, leaving more elementary approaches behind.


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

Best sound bite: “But in important ways, the staircase metaphor fails to capture the way cognitive change actually works. Research shows that children (and adults!) employ a variety of strategies to solve problems, not only the one “typical” of their stage of development.”


See on time.com

Why dialogue is so important for Knowledge Management

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thanks! @LOMBARDI_GLORIA Knowledge transfer is a #social process: you have to engage with other human beings http://t.co/NjTLzxOMFb #esn #km


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

Why is dialogue so important in Knowledge Management? 

“The majority of knowledge within any organization is held in people’s heads. Indeed some would claim that ALL the knowledge is in people’s heads, and that anything which is written down becomes information, rather than knowledge.”


See on www.nickmilton.com

Knowledge Transfer Myths Continued – Ottavio Group

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Ron Ottavio answering more Knowledge Transfer Myths we have heard while speaking with business leaders.


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

Best sound bite: “ANY employee’s knowledge, expertise and wisdom from any line of work can be packaged and measurably transferred—so long as the “apprentice” has the proper desire and capacity to learn it.”

True that.


See on theottaviogroup.com

Can’t force collaboration – Knowledge Jolt with Jack

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Collaboration is important to buisness, but it isn’t the only thing. And it can’t be forced by merely rearranging the deck chairs. Peter Vander Auwera gives me incentive to think about these things.


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

Best sound bite:  “Commit to learning from one another as a regular part of how we do things.  No, not a “database”, but people.  Sure a database or SocBiz tools can provide pointers to people, but only the people can give you a feel for the experience and watch-outs.  They are the ones that can also ask interesting questions.”


See on blog.jackvinson.com

Knoco Insights: Knowledge Capture

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When considering knowledge capture from an expert (a retiring person is a sub set of this) you might wish to put the following three steps in place before moving forward. · The expert is made accountable for the knowledge …


See on www.tomyoungblog.com

Surveillance: an important facet of KM The knowledge dilemma – KMWorld Magazine

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Surveillance: an important facet of KM The knowledge dilemma
KMWorld Magazine
Organizations find themselves on the horns of a knowledge management dilemma. Capturing emergent information may make some senior managers uncomfortable.


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

Best sound bite: “Traditional knowledge management does not focus on the implicit or emergent information that employees possess. With the economic pressures of today, many organizations want to tap into information that will provide a competitive advantage.


See on news.google.com

Wyrd Con: The Convention That’s All About Storytelling – LA Weekly

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LA Weekly
Wyrd Con: The Convention That’s All About Storytelling
LA Weekly
The convention organizers are bringing together the experts in a variety of fields to share knowledge with those who want to learn how to tell a good story.


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

Just because story telling is so important to successful KM implementation, knowledge sharing, and knowledge transfer.


See on www.laweekly.com

For $30 monthly, you can play guitar like Martin Taylor (knowledge transfer and capture in action)

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VISALIA, California: What if the Internet had been around in the classic rock era, and guitar players could reach out to say, Jimi Hendrix or Duane Allman for tips on how to be better players? Or, jazz fans


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

And the connection to Knowledge Management?  It was this particular sound bite that got my attention: “What the Internet has done is sped everything up. Something that took me 10 years to get to a certain level, now I have students who will get there in about 18 months.”

The article discusses how students can now use the internet and associated tools to directly access musicians, and how that then reduces the learning curve — or from a KM perspective, the rate of knowledge transfer and the ability to capture and utilize knowledge.


See on www.usatoday.com

Knoco stories: The five decision points for KM implementation

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Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

This falls quite a bit in line with my own Five Levels of KM Strategy Maturity!


See on www.nickmilton.com

Knoco stories: The creation of Knowledge

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RT @nickknoco: The creation of Knowledge http://t.co/Ibxgeccpau #KM #KMers #knoco


Dr. Dan Kirsch‘s insight:

Best sound bite:  “The main enemy of receptivity is prior knowledge. As Epictetus said, “you cannot teach someone something they think they already know”. This means that if you give people problems they know how to solve, they will not look for additional knowledge, and they will not think outside the box.”


See on www.nickmilton.com