Peeling a KM Metric Onion (may make you cry!)

Peeling a KM onion (may make you cry).

Groan. Here we go again. I stumbled upon a report that provides guidance on what is supposedly the “top” knowledge management metrics. Ah huh. It would seem that the metrics are suspect, how they were determined to be the “top” is suspect, and heck, I’ll go so far as to say that the top five metrics aren’t even “good” KM metrics much less “top” metrics.

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KM – Wild Animals!

Unleash your socialization wild animals!

Unleashing “wild animals” usually doesn’t sound like such a great idea. But with a bit of rethinking what those are and where they live, we can address issues that all the Web 2.0 technology never seems to address.
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Knowledge Sharing: Jack Bauer & Pushing String

Sharing Knowledge - © Cedefop, 1996-2010

Does your organization spend a lot of time trying to “push string” rather than nurture an environment that supports social interaction? Does “Jack Bauer” roam your hallways, eager to “interrogate” an employee rather than encourage spontaneous knowledge sharing?
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National Donut Day 2011

National Donut Day - Yum!

Okay, this probably doesn’t really have much at all to do with knowledge management. But if we really stretch things a bit we could say that it has to do with the sharing of critical knowledge. That will lead to socialization (and possibly even collaboration?). Yeah, that works for me, how about you? Let’s try it with this knowledge sharing: Tomorrow, June 3rd is National Donut Day!

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Finger Tapping and Knowledge Management?

Finger tapping and Knowledge Management?

I stumbled upon an interesting study a little while ago about finger tapping. What we can learn about finger tapping and how that applies to Knowledge Management.
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What Knowledge Workers Really Need

"Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance.” George Bernard Shaw

You know, there are times when you read a blog posting or online article and find yourself left simply shaking your head. Such is the case with an article that I just ran across (“Trends in Knowledge Work”) referencing a McKinsey & Company 2010 article (“The Productivity Imperative”). And that McKinsey article supposedly stated that, “while demand for knowledge workers is continuing to grow, the supply isn’t.” Really? Seriously? Give me a break.
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Knowledge Hiding – Organizational “Prison Rules”

Three children playing hide and seek in a forest.

I read an interesting and recently released study the other day which talks about a relatively new term in the Knowledge Management game – “Knowledge Hiding.” I think though that the concept isn’t necessarily new, and it has similarities to another KM “boogie-man” — the knowledge “hoarder.” But it is in this new study that a label is applied to specific bad behavior that I’d say could be easily described as “Prison Rules” as applied to knowledge sharing.

“Prison Rules” is one of those “urban slang” terms – referring to those situations when someone will do something (driving, sports, holiday shopping, etc.) while cheating, being overly aggressive or intimidating, and otherwise trying to “win” at all costs.

And it seems to me that knowledge hiding then is all about prison rules as they would apply to organizational knowledge sharing.

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Socialization and the Need to Take Time to Think

The Thinker, sculpture at the Musée Rodin in Paris

On May 2nd, Office of Personnel Management Director John Berry was speaking at a KM conference and told the audience that he felt that managers needed to “engage” their people. He offered up an example of failing to engage by describing managers who were walking around or riding elevators while using their smart phones instead of talking with their employees. He described that as a missed opportunity to show employees that they cared and that they actually wanted employees to speak up and share their views.

While saying that I agree completely with what John Berry said and agree that this is certainly one of those cultural issues that impact organizations all the time, I’d like to take his thought a step or two further. Sort of run with it to discuss what I think is an additional issue altogether. I’m talking about the need to take time to think.

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You know it’s bad when Jim Cantore is in your town….

Jim Cantore, The Weather Channel

So says a wall post on Jim Cantore’s Facebook page.  Makes sense to me as I can recall him showing up here in Virginia Beach a few times when we’ve had hurricane warnings and such.  Nothing like having your town show up on a Weather Channel featured story to let you know that you’re really having fun.

And so what does Jim Cantore have to do with KM you ask?  Good question!  Actually it’s all about what Jim Cantore has learned about people and severe weather and how that applies to knowledge management.

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Story Telling, Anecdotes and Conversations

The Boyhood of Raleigh by Sir John Everett Millais, oil on canvas, 1870. A seafarer tells the young Sir Walter Raleigh and his brother the story of what happened out at sea.

On my mind this morning are a couple of blog posts that seem to fit nicely together. Interesting reads, and there is even a test at the end! I’d encourage you to take a look at both of these, and then, if you’re feeling brave – take on the really nifty storytelling “test” that the folks at Anecdote have put together. (I’m pleased to say that I scored a 10 for 10!).

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