Tire Slashing 101 – Defining Knowledge Management

Tire Slashing 101: Knowing who didn't do it helps.

You can learn a lot about the need for an effective vision to support your KM implementation by learning a bit about “tire slashing.” And here’s what you need to understand about both.
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Why KM “Maturity Models” Don’t Work

Do "Maturity Models" Leave You....

Knowledge Management “maturity models” simply don’t work in KM. Now let’s talk about why.

In yesterday’s blog post I’d briefly mentioned something I referred to as the “Knowledge Management Strategy Maturity Levels” and someone asked in an email whether or not that was the same as applying the “maturity model” concept to KM. I replied that it wasn’t, and then thought that this might be a great opportunity to discuss the whole premise of being able to somehow apply a “maturity model” approach or concept to KM and why that doesn’t work.

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Knowledge Management Metrics – Focusing on What’s Important

Do you measure what's important or do you just measure?

When considering what to measure related to Knowledge Management, it is important to ensure that we measure the right things. The biggest challenge is, of course, to know exactly what are those “right things.” But it’s easier than you may think to find those right things to measure.
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Knowledge Hiding – Organizational “Prison Rules”

Three children playing hide and seek in a forest.

I read an interesting and recently released study the other day which talks about a relatively new term in the Knowledge Management game – “Knowledge Hiding.” I think though that the concept isn’t necessarily new, and it has similarities to another KM “boogie-man” — the knowledge “hoarder.” But it is in this new study that a label is applied to specific bad behavior that I’d say could be easily described as “Prison Rules” as applied to knowledge sharing.

“Prison Rules” is one of those “urban slang” terms – referring to those situations when someone will do something (driving, sports, holiday shopping, etc.) while cheating, being overly aggressive or intimidating, and otherwise trying to “win” at all costs.

And it seems to me that knowledge hiding then is all about prison rules as they would apply to organizational knowledge sharing.

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Here’s Your Sign – Yes, in Knowledge Management Too!

Here's your sign!

I’d like to dedicate this particular post to a great comedian Bill Engvall, and his routine focused around “Here’s your sign.”   This post is for those who in implementing Knowledge Management, truly need their sign, and especially for this “poster child” that really needed a sign.

 

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Successful Knowledge Management Implementation

Does your organization "get" KM?

I was having some off-line discussions related to KM metrics, as well as how to determine which KM initiatives make for the “best” for initial implementation, etc. And somewhere in those discussions we wandered smack into the middle of discussing why it seems that so many initial KM efforts have “problems.” And then at about the same time I received this absolute gem from Hubert Saint-Onge:

“When I was Senior Vice President of Strategic Capability at Clarica, I had to present my business plan on a quarterly basis to the CEO. In addition to knowledge management and learning, my portfolio included strategic planning, internal and external communication, human resources, and corporate branding. In other words, the full basket of intangibles.

The CFO attended these meetings and kept bringing up the measurement question. I was always able to side step the issue. One day, he became more vociferous than usual on the need to measure all this crap — in his words. Luckily, I had many opportunities to practice an answer. I said that I admired his passion for measuring and that I would like to take his lead on this matter. I promised right there that if he would share with me how he was measuring his organization’s finance and actuarial work was adding value to the company, I would right away adopt and apply this framework to the activities I was responsible for.

He looked at me dumb-founded. It had never occurred to him that he should measure what was considered conventional activities in the company: it’s that new so-called ‘crap’ we needed to measure. Isn’t it interesting that we put the onus of measurement on what is new when we have pile upon pile we don’t measure because it is just so. As all of us who have worked on this for decades, measuring the impact of growing intangible assets on the bottom line is no easy feat. It certainly cannot be trivialized because sometimes having wrong answers is worse than having no answer.”

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KM Failures or Failure to Do KM? (Or failure is easy when you have no KM vision!)

Train wreck at Montparnasse, France (1895).

I read an article the other day which made the claim that “About half of company knowledge-management initiatives stagnate or fail.” I asked the author of that article for the source of that statistic and I learned that it came from, well let’s just call them “X.”

Wow. A 50% failure rate? Would you willing take on something – voluntarily, with other choices readily available — if you knew that the failure rate was 50%? That sure doesn’t make much sense to me. Does it make sense to you? Seems like a bunch of potential candidates for the “List of business failures.”

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Are You NIH? Or Perhaps IHBLRIA? Well,You Should be PFE or Maybe PFEAAWP!

Going in Circles, or Taking the "Road Ahead?"

I stumbled upon a blog post by Richard Stuebi the other day (“On Innovation”)  in which he discussed a meeting that he’d recently attended on the topic of innovation.  During that meeting Dr. Chris Thoen from P&G spoke of an interesting twist that P&G has applied to the NIH problem.

The “what” problem, you ask?

That would be the “Not Invented Here” (NIH) syndrome.

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KM a Fad? KM a Failure? News at 11PM!

So much for "fad" labels!

KM a Fad?  KM a Failure?  Well no, not even. But it’s going to take a little bit of “thread pulling” to fully explore this one. And it makes for an interesting topic of discussion today that goes rather neatly with another post of mine — Not Dead Yet (think Monty Python).

So buckle up, it’s going to get a bit bumpy.

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Not Dead Yet (think Monty Python)

[This is a reprint of a blog posting originally published at ITtoolbox on 9/25/2006. I wanted to have this one front and ready as I intend to follow-up another post along the same topic. Enjoy!]

Okay, this one isn’t so much a Daily Dose as it’s probably a chuckle. Well, maybe not exactly a chuckle…perhaps more like a snickering under my breath….

Was doing some searching this morning and turns out that a couple of my keywords steered me in a particular direction…and that took me to a blog post…which took me to some archived articles…and although I’ve been down this particular road before, I didn’t realize that there was now a new sign on the route. There is this “guy” out in the KM world…keeping this non-attribution…who has been forecasting the “death” of KM for about five + years. Not just leaving little posted notes on his ‘fridge (reading “Note to self, KM is dead. Buy flowers.”). Nope, more like the crazy that stands on a busy street corner with a sign that screams, “The end of the world is near.” (Preceded no doubt, by the death of KM according to him). All the while he encourages all he meets to “drink his Kool-aid.”

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